Our Approach

We use the collaborative leadership approach by facilitating mutual enhancement among those working for a common purpose. Our board is comprised of organizations and institutions who are well-respected leaders of healthcare. This foundation is built on the principle of being true healthcare catalyst for the people in Tennessee. We drive resources and opportunities to one place. To collectively impact one community at a time.

THE COLLABORATION CONTINUUM

In common practice the term collaboration serves as a handy label to mark and acknowledge working relationships between individuals, departments, or organizations. However, collaboration as a working relationship actually lies on a continuum of inter-organizational models, each of which has identifiable attributes and requires specific capacities and inter-institutional supports. As we move left-to-right across the continuum, we increase our potential to accomplish together that which cannot be achieved alone. Each level requires an increase in time, trust, and turf-sharing.

COLLABORATION CONTINUUM1

IMMURING

Conducting activities without input from or exchange with other institutions

NETWORKING

Exchanging information for
mutual benefit

COORDINATING

In addition, altering activities
to achieve a common purpose

COOPERATING

In addition, sharing resources (e.g., staff, finances, space,
instrumentation)

COLLABORATING

In addition, learning from each other to enhance each other’s capacity

INTEGRATING

Completely merging operations, administrative structures, and budgets. The constituent parts are no longer discernible

CAPACITIES NEEDED

IMMURINGBASIC CAPACITIES

Basic capacities for functioning within a single institution.

NETWORKINGCLEAR COMMUNICATION

Clear communication channels across institutions; strategies for identifying interested others at all institutions.

COORDINATINGSTATED OBJECTIVES

Stated objective; known leadership structure through which activities and alterations are managed; plan for regularly evaluating the success of the group’s work and goals and making needed adjustments.

COOPERATINGSTATED PROCESS

Stated process for managing budget and/or staff time; possibly written agreements and access to decision-making bodies.

COLLABORATINGRECIPROCAL LEARNING

Regular opportunities to come together for reciprocal learning.

INTEGRATINGRESOURCES AND SUPPORT

Access to all resources and support available to groups contained within a single organization (e.g., decision-making bodies, leadership, visibility within each organization).

INTER-INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT NEEDED

IMMURINGNONE

NETWORKINGADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT

Administrative support for data collection and list, website, and publication preparation and upkeep; tools for connecting people.

COORDINATINGSHARED OBJECTIVES

Professional development opportunities for articulating shared objectives, leading across institutions, assessing progress toward common purpose; incentives for participation; funds for program implementation.

COOPERATINGDECISION MAKING

Professional development opportunities for budget development and management, working with staff; templates and explicit pathways for writing, endorsing, documenting, and archiving written agreements; direct liaisons to decision making bodies; staff to coordinate and conduct assessments.

COLLABORATINGADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Additional resources to support programming.

INTEGRATINGCODIFIED PROCEDURES

Champions and sponsors in every institution; codified procedures to ensure stable access to all resources and support; clear pathways to request and vet changes to policy and positions.

1 The original Collaboration Continuum, which included Networking, Coordinating, Cooperating, and Collaborating, comes from Arthur T. Himmelman, Collaboration for a Change:Definitions, Decision‐making Models, Roles, and Collaboration Process Guide. January 2002, Himmelman Consulting, Minneapolis, MN.©2015 Debra Mashek. Shared under Creative Commons License (Attribution 3.0 Unreported). Please cite as: Mashek,D. (June, 2015). Capacities and Institutional Supported Needed along the Collaboration Continuum. A presentation to the Academic Deans Committee of The Claremont Colleges, Claremont. CA

Our Current Projects

Academic Detailing

Pilot training: Nashville, TN. April 7-8, 2019

Academic Detailing (AD) is a one-on-one, clinical based outreach educational technique to help clinicians provide evidence-based care to patients. Trained academic detailers meet with clinicians to assess individual needs, and needs of the practice. These educators then offer tailored, evidence-based clinical recommendations.

ROUTE ONE powered by QuizTime

ROUTE ONE is a collaborative project between ONE Tennessee and QuizTime that offers education to physicians, nurses, advanced practitioners, and other health care professionals by delivering a high-value, convenient mobile learning experience to their fingertips.

Upcoming Events

Early Recovery After Surgery

For more information reach out to Tennessee Hospital Association’s,  Tennessee Center for Patient Safety

Opioid Lite Emergency Department

A patient’s first opioid exposure often occurs during an emergency department (ED) visit. The “opioid-light” order set included alternative therapies for migraine or headache, musculoskeletal pain, joint fracture or dislocation, renal colic, and chronic abdominal pain. In addition, hospitals evaluated individual prescribing patterns to target opportunities for additional education to high-use providers. Hospitals across Tennessee are implementing proven and innovative strategies to reduce opioid prescribing and dependence, as well as new models for care of those fighting addiction.

For more information reach out to Tennessee Hospital Association’s,  Tennessee Center for Patient Safety.